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Integrative Biology

COS researchers suggest low climate change resilience in rocky Pacific Northwest shores

A study by College of Science researchers says the ecosystems at our shores may face greater danger in a changing climate.

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Faculty and Staff

Science faculty awarded L.L. Stewart Faculty Fellowships to bridge science and art

Two College of Science professors have been awarded the 2024 L.L. Stewart Faculty Fellowship.

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Students

Zoology graduate thrives with Oregon State's Ecampus

Samantha Crockett's journey from a struggling college student to a thriving zoology graduate is a testament to the transformative power of online education. Faced with isolation and academic disillusionment, she found her stride at Oregon State University's Ecampus program, where supportive professors and flexible learning opportunities reignited her passion for zoology.

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Events

College of Science hosts Inaugural Research Showcase

The College of Science is hosting the inaugural research showcase on Tuesday, May 21, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Oregon State Memorial Union Room 13.

A medium shot of a pacific sideband snail.
News

Researchers discover product that kills agricultural pests is also deadly to native Pacific Northwest snail

A product used to control pest slugs on farms in multiple countries is deadly to least one type of native woodland snail endemic to the Pacific Northwest.

Professor and Department Head Dee Denver led a 10-week laboratory project that showed the effect of a biotool marketed as Nemaslug on the Pacific sideband snail. The study was published today in PLOS One.

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News

From 'Dune' to coastal conservation, researchers lead the way in shifting sands

Three years after the release of “Dune,” a film adaptation of Frank Herbert’s epic 1965 sci-fi novel, “Dune: Part Two” is reigniting the public’s fascination with sandy environs and humanity’s efforts to reshape them.

Sally Hacker, a professor of integrative biology in the College of Science, is working with the Oregon departments of Parks and Recreation and Land Conservation and Development to create guidebooks for coastal dune management based on the best available science.

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Events

Celebrating excellence in research: 2024 College of Science Awards

The College of Science gathered on Feb. 29 to recognize and celebrate our high achieving faculty and staff at the 2024 Combined Awards Ceremony.

The following faculty and staff received awards in the category of research.

Congratulations to all the awardees!

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Students

Pre-med undergrad explores the convergence of medicine and research

After landing a coveted internship spot reserved for Honors College students, biology fourth-year Varsha Karthikeyan explored the nuanced intersection between research and medicine.

Alysia Vrailas-Mortimer sits at a lab table showing equipment to a student.
Research

Expanding undergraduate research: Fruit fly experience has students “buzzing”

Every student deserves hands-on research opportunities. But how can that be a reality with limitations on time and available faculty?

Alysia Vrailas-Mortimer, College of Science associate professor and principal investigator with the Linus Pauling Institute, and her colleagues in the Fly-CURE consortium stumbled upon a solution they hope to expand across the U.S.

A beetle is encased in yellow amber with antennae over three times its body length growing from its head.
OSU Press Releases

College of Science researcher identifies new species of ancient beetle

One hundred million years ago, as iguanodons and triceratops fled from hungry tyrannosaurs, another biological drama played out on the ground where the giant reptiles trod: Male beetles using their supersized antennae in combat for mates.

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Graduate students

Science graduate students receive prestigious National Science Foundation fellowship

Four College of Science graduate students were selected for the prestigious NSF Graduate Student Research Fellowship Program in the 2022-23 school year. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in STEM who are pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees in the U.S.

Catherine Raffin poses in front of a bush of vibrant pink flowers.
Students

The field where ‘everything matters’: Biology senior chases an insect dream

Many people grow up with a fear of bugs, and above all else, a fear of spiders. Oregon State biology senior Catherine Raffin was just the same. The sight of eight spindly legs and a pair of fangs made her skin crawl, so she did the only logical thing: purchased a pet tarantula. “From a young age I was always morbidly fascinated with the insects everybody fears,” she said. “I thought it was crazy how something so small can be so terrifying.”