Skip to main content
Two aquatic snails resting on a bed of seaweed

Genetic discovery may offer new avenue of attack against schistosomiasis

  Researchers have discovered a group of genes in this snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, that conveys resistance to the parasite that causes schistosomiasis.  

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered a group of genes in one species of snail that provide a natural resistance to the flatworm parasite that causes schistosomiasis, and opens the door to possible new drugs or ways to break the transmission cycle of this debilitating disease.

Schistosomiasis infects more than 200 million people in more than 70 countries, and is most common in areas with poor sanitation. It can cause chronic, lifelong disability, beginning with gastrointestinal problems and sometimes leading to liver damage, kidney failure, infertility and bladder cancer.

Schistosomisasis, which is native to Africa but has now spread around the world, has been called a neglected global pandemic. Its impact on human health rivals that of malaria.

However, the circular transmission of this complex disease depends upon spending some time as an infection in aquatic snails, where the number of parasites is greatly magnified. Snails may therefore offer a key opportunity to break the cycle of transmission.

Read more at the OSU Newsroom