TitleBATEMAN PRINCIPLES AND THE MEASUREMENT OF SEXUAL SELECTION IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1994
AuthorsArnold, SJ
JournalAmerican Naturalist
Volume144
PaginationS126-S149
Keywordsmale reproductive success coral-reef fish simultaneous hermaphroditism attractive structures chamaelirium-luteum natural-population mating system evolution size consequences
Abstract

A. J. Bateman's approach to animal mating systems is generalized to provide a framework for studying sexual selection in plants and hermaphroditic animals. The key feature of this generalization is the realization that the relationship between fecundity and mating success can take a variety of forms beyond those observed in Bateman's data. Thus, under many circumstances, female animals, or the female function of a hermaphroditic plant or animal, can experience sexual selection. Path diagrams are used to show that sexual selection is a component of fecundity selection. Finally, statistical procedures are discussed for measuring sexual selection in plant and animal populations with separate or combined sexes.